Pathology Rotation

Sorry for the hiatus guys!  Before taking this rotation, I heard that it is one of the easiest, most laid back rotation of your final year.  They were absolutely right plus I learned a ton of very valuable information.  I encourage taking this rotation after a busy, long-hour type rotation or during the time you are really studying hard for the NAVLE examination (National Boards of Medical Examiners).  You get to sleep in (does not begin until 10AM), and you do not have to worry about taking care of inpatients or discharges.  The only documentation you have to do are necropsy reports that take an hour of your time at most.  There are also 2 quizzes and one group project.

Two areas of pathology that we focused on were necropsy and clinical pathology.  The clinical pathology portion occurs first in the morning followed by necropsy for the afternoon.  Depending on how many animals get dropped off for necropsy, we usually leave at 4-5pm.  I was a little nervous for the clinical pathology portion because I struggle with that course during my 2nd year in vet school.  After the first day of rotation, I was so thrilled how much I remembered from class!  That is the best part I love about clinical rotations.  You get the opportunity to reinforce what you learned and begin applying the knowledge to real life scenarios.  I also loved how we get to see the underlying cause of the animal’s death.  Sometimes, owners may not have enough money to pursue further diagnostic tests to diagnose the disease that is causing the pet’s clinical signs.  Even though we may not see the problem grossly, further diagnostics such as histopathology, infectious disease panels, and other tests will help us get the diagnosis.  In addition, over 90% of the cases you see in clinics involves Complete Blood Count (CBC) and Chemistry, so I strongly encourage that you make flashcards of what cause discrepancies of the cells and electrolytes (ex: decreased RBCs is anemia due to blood loss or lysis (death), elevated sodium (Na) could mean dehydration, a prolonged fever, excess intake, hyperaldosteronism, etc.)

Necropsy was enlightening.  There were many gross moments, but the findings were worth the process.  One case was particularly out of the ordinary that I had to dissect and remove organs from.  An armadillo was shot in his cervical (neck) area.  The reason it was brought to the school was because the person got some blood splattered in the eye, and he was afraid he was going to get leprosy.  Armadillos are naturally infected with Hansen’s disease (leprosy), but very rarely will people get leprosy from an armadillo, but our job was too confirm if the armadillo had it or not in order to make the pedestrian feel more at ease.

Overall, this rotation was absolutely wonderful.  Make sure to put “Vicks Vapor Rub” under your nose when you know something putrid is coming in for necropsy 🙂

Here’s what other people had to say about it!

(What was Orientation Day like?)

-Orientation at 8:30 in the room by necropsy going over procedures and touring clin path. We got about 2 hours for lunch and had to be back for necropsy at 1. Change into their scrubs before then (they provide scrubs and boots, you bring gloves). Meet in the same room and divide up the cases for the day. Fill out the pre-necropsy part of the form think through what differentials you have and what samples and test you want to run. You watch a pathologist do a necropsy then dive into the case load for the day. We happened to have 6 cases so we were there til 8 but it depends on case load.

(Average Daily hours on duty?)

usually 10-12ish for clinpath in the morning, necropsy 1-? depends entirely on case load. The day we had no necropsies we had to check in every half hour til 4.

(What is the attire?  When do you change into scrubs?)

-anything in the morning, change into their scrubs in the afternoon

-scrubs and boots in afternoon were provided = great!

-anything in the morning, scrubs and boots in the afternoon are provided.


(What do doctors/residents/techs constantly harp on?)

-Use appropriate terms and past-tense in path reports

-describe what you see–>don’t need to try to make things more difficult. Just say lungs were heavy and firm instead of “pulmonary edema”.

(What are some struggles to watch out for?)

-The smells! Wear a mask and put vick’s inside it (theres 3 containers of it in the necropsy room)

(Words of encouragement)

-Brought snacks and cold drinks to the path break room- was so nice to have them when working on reports at the end! Also, necropsy was really cool – really neat to see all of the different animals

-They don’t expect you to know everything! Ask tons of questions. Bring your computers/ipads and leave your valuables in the necropsy writing room NOT the locker rooms. Use your computers to look up differentials for your cases and to start your report then. Many times the necropsy form will say “puppy acute death” with no other details. So trying to think of all the viral, baterial, fungal and congenital causes for an acute death in a puppy is easier when you have Dr. google:) For the first 2 weeks, you can type your necropsy report and send it to the resident later. The third week you stay there and write it.

Through Him!

~Camille

John 14:27  “Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you. Not as the world gives do I give to you. Let not your hearts be troubled, neither let them be

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Surprisingly Not That Bad (Week 9)

Week’s Itinerary= SA Digestive Quizzes #3 and 4, Pathology Pre-Test

This week was honestly not that bad!  We had a quiz or exam every day, but the experience was nowhere as stressful as the previous weeks.

The SA digestive quizzes were again tedious to study for, but very informative.  The professor helped us with one of them by uploading her power point slides with the same quiz material.  I highly recommend studying that before tackling the required textbook reading.

This was my last chance to try and successfully pass the next pathology pre-test. I didn’t pass the last one, and remember you need to pass with a 90 or better in order to not take the real exam.  The material for this exam was beastly and not fun to look over sometimes.  The focus was on pathological features for brain and central nervous system disorders, and I had to plow through a ton of material to get ready. Fortunately, I passed by getting 90 percent of the answers right!  The professor was surprisingly nice with her questions this time.  Thank goodness.  This meant I did not have to worry about taking the exam on Friday, so I hope my other classmates did well that day.

This past weekend, I went back home to help my aunt in Atlanta with a business project that Microsoft has been backing since this past summer. Her program is called “Global Education Consultant Group” and it aims to help students who are high school seniors or college freshmen interested in STEAM careers (Science + Technology +Engineering + Arts [newly added] +Mathematics).  Here is her website:

http://drelainebryan.com/services/gecg-microsoft-fall-stem-program/

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I helped my aunt with photography and met some of the students she’s working with. They are eager to learn how to become leaders in their field of study and to learn how to communicate and network their way into good jobs, or maybe even creating their own businesses.

If you’re a young person who fits this description, check out the website. Students in this program have met not only college recruiters, but learned how music promotion works from the managers who manages Usher’s career. Next month Jovita Moore, a news anchor at Atlanta’s channel 2, will meet with them.

I was glad to lend a hand with this great project.

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Here is my aunt, Elaine Bryan, discussing the program

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Here is one of the students who took part in the program last summer and is now an ambassador for my aunt’s company.  She created the new logo for my aunt’s foundation.  She is also interested in going to Pharmacy School and hopes to be an anesthesiologist.  Wow!

Through Him,

~Camille

Ephesians 4:29 ” Let no corrupt communication proceed out of your mouth, but that which is good to the use of edifying, that it may minister grace unto the hearers.”

Bring it On (Week 5)

Week’s Itinerary= Radiology Exam 2, Respiratory Pathology Pre-test and Exam, Ovariohysterectomy Feline Surgery, and Surgery Quiz #4

I looked at the class schedule and realized that I have two exams for four consecutive weeks, on Mondays and Fridays. As a result, I can barely tell the differences between weekends and weekdays.  This Monday we had our radiology exam 2 and my feline spay surgery (ovariohysterectomy).  I was nervous before taking my radiology exam because of how revolting my quiz grade was last Friday. I approached the exam with a feeling of doom lurking ahead, but I should never have let that quiz discourage me.  The exam was surprisingly straight forward: it covered general concepts and abnormalities that can be detected in x-rays of equine forelimbs and hindlimbs.

Surgery was exhilarating!  I was finally the surgeon this time, and our patient was an adorable, 16-week-old female Seal Point Siamese.  A young cat equals a tiny reproductive tract, so this task was definitely an exciting challenge.  Another big issue for kittens is they can easily become hypotensive (low blood pressure), so we had fluids and emergency drugs ready to go for our patient.  I had the honor of taking out one ovary and the uterus while my surgery assistant took out the second ovary.  No signs of hemorrhage were detected, so our surgery procedure was a success.  And quiz #4 on Friday went well.  It consisted of an anesthesia and surgery portion.

Great news.  After our surgery, a classmate adopted our patient!  I am so happy for her because she is in great hands.

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Immediately after surgery, I had to begin studying for our pathology pre-test, which was  exhausting.  The pre-test was early Tuesday morning, so I did have overnight to review everything.  If you don’t remember from last year, we are allowed to take a pre-test before our actual test.  If we pass it with a score of 90% or better, we do not have to take the actual exam.  I love that rule.  However, passing the pre-test is easier said than done.  I did not pass the pre-test, but I did exceptionally well on the exam that was taken on Friday.

Through Him,

~Camille

Psalm 68:5-6:
“A father to the fatherless, a defender of widows,  is God in his holy dwelling.  God sets the lonely in families..”

Yureeka (Spring Week 12)

Week’s Itinerary = Systemic Pathology Final, Ophthalmology Final, and Clinical Pathology

This semester of core classes is officially over!  YESSS!  This week was intense though.  We had 3 important finals this week that I tried to prepare myself to the best of my abilities.  They were Systemic Pathology (Digestive System), Ophthalmology, and Clinical Pathology).  I was able to pass Sys. Path’s Pre-test (Thank God/ format just like all the others), and Ophthalmology was a 4-hour in class, open book-open notes final.

The hardest one out of the 3 was definitely Clinical Pathology for me.  It is cumulative, and I believe that how I studied for it this time greatly helped me!  Make flashcards and put differentials for each test being run (ex: hypercalcemia and its differentials, high levels of urea and creatinine and their differentials, etc.)  You should have done this already since the 2nd exam.

Guys, I feel like I am on summer vacation right for how relaxed I feel right now!  You will not hear from me again until after electives where I will give you a run down on how the classes went (Rate My Electives).

Take care!

~Camille

Psalm 118:14= “The LORD is my strength and my song; he has become my salvation.”

At the end of the tunnel… Spring Break!!! (Week 9)

Week’s Itinerary = Surgery Written and Practical Final, Systemic Pathology Pre-test and Test, Toxicology Quiz 3, Ophthalmology Quiz, and Boston Mission Trip

How on Earth did I make it this far!?  It was through the power and strength of Jesus Christ!!  Amen Lord!  So, I am writing this on the commencement of my Spring Break, which means my thoughts have gone elsewhere.  I will do my best to recount my experience this week.  Four assignments this week!

1) General Surgery= We had our Written and Practical Final on Monday, and I thought the questions were not as crazy as from Principles of Surgery.  The written portion was primarily multiple choice with only 4 short answers.  Don’t be fooled with the short answers though.  They want you to be thorough with your answers, and questions was worth 5 points from your grade.  Show them that you know the information.  The practical portion was extremely easy!!!  There were a total of 32 questions (all multiple choice).  It will feel very drawn out though (you will finish most questions in under 15 seconds then wait/ each station is 90 seconds . . . hope you eat because my stomach was growling very noisily! J You’ll do fine!

2)Systemic Pathology and Pre-test and Test= Yeah-yeah, this means I did not pass the pre-test.  So what!  I was determine to succeed for the test!  So, you guys are used to my pre-tests being done online.  Well, the professor switched it up on us!  We were given just one sheet of paper and asked to write the pathogenesis on some diseases!  Pathogenesis is my weak point!!  But, it was not bad at all guys!  I actually enjoyed the test experience! 🙂

3)Toxicology Quiz= Having this with another exam is not fun at all!  But, glory to God I passed!  Gosh, this is a painful class!!  It was 16 multiple choice questions this time.

4)Ophthalmology Quiz= Our last quiz in this class!!  And it was one of the most challenging ones 😦

Update on Clinical Pathology:  I did well!!  Thank you Jesus!  You can do it guys.  Half of it was take-home though, so that greatly aided in my success!

I am in Boston right now!!  I know random right?  Well, my Bible study group asked if I could join them on a mission trip to evangelize in schools such as Harvard and MIT.  This is my first time here in Boston and enjoying my time!!  God, use me as a vessel to reveal your love and beautiful light.

ImageFirst time using a subway system!

ImageCool looking alleyways in Boston!

Through Him,

~Camille

Matthew 28:19= “Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit,”

Keep it Coming! (Week 9)

Week’s Itinerary = Last Surgery, Clinical Pathology Paper, Polysystemic Final, Clinical Pathology Exam 2

I’m not afraid of you exams & papers & quizzes and assignments!!!!  Bring it on! 🙂 I seriously thought the intensity of this semester would dwindle by the end of February, but the intensity just keeps on coming.  I was hoping to become numb and get used to all this rigor, but each week continues to bring forth new challenges!  Five things happened this week:

1)    Opthalmology Quiz #4= it was the best grade I received for all my quizzes I took so far. One more to go!  Remember, doing the quizzes while the professor is lecturing is very helpful!!  You follow what they are saying plus you are getting an assignment done.  BOOM done.

2)    Clinical Pathology Paper= Yay!  Our group did well!!  This one was so much easier than the first one.  It had one case with about 18 questions regarding that one case instead of having to answer questions to MANY cases (tougher).  Advice, each member should look at everything (don’t split up the assignment/ trust me).

3)    Last Surgery! Guys, this was an action-packed week!!  I was the anesthesiologist, and I was having some TROUBLE.  The pig decided to stop breathing on  me . . . I and the pig became apneic in other words.  Guys, talk about nerve racking!!  Don’t panic if this happens to you!  Basically, an animal can go without O2 for about 5minutes before threat of death approaches.  So, my Anesthesiologist professor came over to me and said wait 5 minutes to not bag the patient (pump O2 into the lungs), and it should begin to breathe on its own (I have been facilitating with breathing for it for 10 minutes!).  That 5 minutes was the longest 5 minutes of my life!!  Fortunately, the pig began panting under anesthesia, which was good but not good at the same time (had to then adjust the isoflurane using the vaporizer).  Praise the Lord it did not die on my watch!!!

4)    Polysystemic Final= It was straightforward, but of course still study your heart out.  It was all multiple choice, and 4 teachers had questions for us :/

5)    Clinical Pathology(Exam 2)= Later years may not get the privilege of doing a take-home exam like how we did.  It was a blessing for us after all those Snow Days!  We had a take-home portion (strictly cases/ short answer and multiple choice) and a in-class portion (shorter but more nit-picky questions/ multiple choice)

One more week until Spring Break!!!

Through Him,

~Camille

Romans 8:28 “And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.”

Surgery Time! (Week 6)

Week’s Itinerary1st surgery day and Surgery Quiz 1, Renal Pathology Exam and Bone/Muscle Pre-test, Toxicology Quiz 1, Polysystemic Case 2, and Anesthiology Final Exam and Final Draft Paper Due

I love surgeries!!  It was an exciting week for me because we finally got to do hands-on work with our cute little piglets!  Our group decided to not name our piglet because we knew we would get too attached, so we are continuing to call it Case # …… 🙂  It actually helps me to not get too attached even though I am already.  Here are some helpful advice for you before you do Lab #2 which focused primarily on anesthetizing the pig and sterilely draping as if we are preparing for a surgery:

-bring your own surgical scissors

So, we had some difficulty tearing tape for securing the catheter in the ear and taping the Doppler probe onto the medial plantar region of the forelimb.

-Remember to eat something!

The doctors told us at least one person faints during these surgery sessions, so EAT PLEASE!  That should not be a problem for me, but I’ll let you know if that happens…

-Relax

    Make sure to prepare before the labs.  The doctors provide a lot of handouts and videos that will ease the surgery experience, so take advantage of that.  If you have a question, I would advise asking your group members first before asking the doctors because your questions may have been answered in the videos and handouts.  The doctors are very patient with you, but they may sometimes not help you immediately if you have not taken the time to research material on your own.

-Weaknesses

So this week, I did struggle with placing the catheter in the ear & being the student doing anesthesia.  Fortunately, the doctors were very patient with me as I was doing the catheter (it is not easy).  They helped guide me after I failed on my first attempt.  I never felt embarrassed or looked down upon for not doing it correctly the first time.  Thank you for your kindness and patience!  Then again, our group’s surgery time is in the beginning of the week, so maybe they have not been bombarded by so many students yet 🙂

To me, having the task of being the Anesthesiologist is the most demanding.  You are the one who has to watch vital signs every 5 minutes!  It feels like the patient’s life is all in your hands and supervision.  That feeling is so crazy for me!  Remember important steps to take if you see complications such as hypotension, hypoventilation, and hypothermia and what to do with fluids that are provided.

All of this is just one thing we had to accomplish this week.  We also had 6 other things to do!

1) Monday morning, we had to do our Renal Pathology Exam and Musculoskeletal Pre-test.  This was a big day for me because I did not do as well as I should have done on my Renal Pre-test.  Guess what??  I got an A on both my Renal and Musculoskeletal exams! Trusting on your strength God!!

2) Oh man, Toxicology… that quiz #1 was brutal!  It was all multiple choice but many were very picky and specific questions within the lecture slides.  He did not put the Echo lectures up online until the day before the quiz.  The quiz is heavily weighted (20% of your grade), so study for it like you were studying for an exam.  There will be 4 quizzes total.

3&4) An Anesthesia paper and Polysystemic Case 2 were due this week.  The great thing about them is how we can be in groups as large as 4 people to share our creative minds.

5) General Surgery Quiz 1= It was short answer, and I did not have to study that much because information where I do things hands-on sticks much better to me than just reading it from a textbook or lecture slides.  Handouts were provided, so I would look over those notes real quick before the quiz

 6) The big day has finally come . . . the Anesthesiology Final Exam!!!  It was a 3 hour exam of only short answer questions.  I have to be honest with you that I was a bit nervous for this final.  Guys, the experience was very long but better than what I thought I would dread.  He did have a review session that laid out the learning objectives and what to focus on, so I thought it was beneficial to go.  Study hard for it though!!  You can do it.

This weekend, I decided to go to the Real Life Real Impact again (by Christian Veterinarian Fellowship Club).  Last year, we went to Auburn University in Alabama.  This year was at North Carolina State University.  I thought the experience this year was way better than last year, and I got to enjoy it with some of my classmates.

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Through Him,

~Camille

John 10:10 “The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I have come that they may have life, and have it to the full.”