Ophthalmology Rotation

Whenever I am learning about the eye, I am always so captivated and in awe of how beautifully and intricately God made us.  I appreciate new discoveries by scientists.  Their findings give me a more behind the scenes view of God’s masterful work.  Thank you!
 
Ophthalmology rotation was a busy rotation, but it was not severely difficult.  I was constantly on my feet seeing the next patient, but our physical exams mainly honed in on the eye using sophisticated tools that would determine the pet’s current eye defect.  My favorite task was dilating the pupil and shining a light through a lens in order to see the retina.  It is a beautiful anatomical structure found in the back of the eye.  After you do a thorough eye exam, then the resident comes in and does their exam but with more advanced equipment.  After the resident looks at the eye, then the faculty ophthalmologist assesses the eye.
 
We also had the wonderful opportunity to observe surgeries performed on eyes.  My favorite surgery was a phacoemulsification, which is a modern version of cataract surgery where the lens are removed through emulsion with an ultrasonic hand piece.
 
Here’s what other people had to say about this rotation:
What was Orientation Day like?
-Arrived at 8:00 and briefly went over what to expect during the rotation.  Looked at the schedule for the day and started seeing appointments like normal.
 
Average Daily Hours on Duty?
-8:00-9:00 to 4:45-5:30
 
What is the attire? (When do you change into scrubs?)
-business casual with white coat and nametag; bring scrubs in case of emergency surgeries
What do doctors/residents/techs constantly harp on?
-know your drugs, how to do a basic exam, etc.  nothing is harped on and they are happy to teach easy basic stuff, but you could review a little
 
What are some struggles to watch out for?
-Appointments take forever.  I would recommend just setting your clients up for a long process in the beginning by explaining how the teaching hospital works and that things move slowly.  Most clients are pretty reasonable about it, especially if they know ahead of time.
 
Words of encouragement (positive comments/stories during your time in this rotation)
-Super nice doctors.  Rounds are helpful and consults from other departments are good opportunities to learn about the basic exam.
 
Difficulty Level (1-3)? 1= It’s a breeze/ 3= really difficult workload
1 / 3
Through Him,
 
~Camille
 
Philippians 4:11-13= “Not that I am speaking of being in need, for I have learned in whatever situation I am to be content. I know how to be brought low, and I know how to abound. In any and every circumstance, I have learned the secret of facing plenty and hunger, abundance and need. I can do all things through him who strengthens me.”

Radiology Rotation

Like Pathology, this was another rotation that was one of the easiest, most laid back rotations of your final year.  You still did have to get to school by 8AM, but you did not have inpatients or written documents to worry about.  We only had to do 2 short exams in order to pass the rotation.  There were 3 duties that we were selected to do each day: 1) a radiology technician when we get a patient and position the animal properly for the most appropriate technique, 2) an ultrasound technician where we hold the patients while the veterinarian who is certified in radiology performs the ultrasound while teaching us important findings, and 3) interpretation or radiographs.  I enjoyed interpretation the mot because I was discussing individual cases one-on-one with a specialist.  Even though we rarely got the opportunity to do interpretation due to a busy case load, I tried to soak in every advice I received from them during those days.

Here’s what other people had to say about it!

(What was Orientation Day like?)

-Arrive at 8:00. Get a brief explanation on how to use the equipment. Take a look at the on call shifts and switch as need to meet your schedule. You will have one of three tasks: 1) help take radiographs as needed 2) sit with the resident as she/he interprets radiographs that are or have already been taken 3) help with ultrasound studies. Overall pretty chill. You have 30 minutes for lunch

(Average Daily hours on duty?)

8-5 or 6

(What is the attire?  When do you change into scrubs?)

-Business casual, white coats.

-you can wear scrubs every day, with white coat

(What do doctors/residents/techs constantly harp on?)

-Know anatomy and radiology basics from lectures, they will teach you positioning and how to use all the machines

(Words of encouragement)

-Everyone is very friendly and helps the students learn – rounds are great, and students are involved in all the cases (not so much CT/MRI)

(Difficulty Level (1-3)? 1= It’s a breeze/ 3= really difficult workload)

(1)

Through Him!

~Camille

Ephesians 1:7= “In him we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of sins, in accordance with the riches of God’s grace.”

Community Practice Clinic

This rotation was vitally important and needed for my career planning.  Many of my classmates had the wonderful opportunity of being vet technicians before going to vet school.  They got to see behind the scenes of how a private practice is supposed to operate on a daily basis.  I got to shadow veterinarians but not actually get to handle patients thoroughly, take a history, or prepare medications.  What I liked about this rotation was how I got to do all of that plus make decisions for the pet’s care.  It was the sense of independence that I needed to feel, and the head doctors gave us that responsibility while also guiding us along the way.  It also helped me appreciate the duties of a technician even more.  We can easily overlook their hard work, and we need to make sure we verbally acknowledge and appreciate them every day.  Honestly, the only part of this rotation that I did not enjoy was how long the process of having the patient in the clinic before discharge.  There are so many steps in between to get from point A to Point B (waiting for a veterinarian to see your patient, waiting for medications to be filled, writing the discharges, etc).  You can tell how long the process can take when a vaccination appointment last about 2 hours long.  A part from that, this is a great rotation to look forward to taking.

 Here’s what other people had to say about it!

(What was Orientation Day like?)

-Orientation was 8-1, then you get thrown straight into appointments!

-You get a 2 page quiz about the powerpoints they sent you a week before. The orientation is super long and tons on information being thrown at you at once. Then they throw you straight to appointments, and all the paperwork you have to do could be overwhelming at first.

(Average Daily hours on duty?)

7:30-5+ (usually got done by 6:30-7:00 pm)

(What is the attire?  When do you change into scrubs?)

-wear nice clothes and a white coat. Bring clean scrubs to change into if needed

-Wear scrubs + white coat -OR- business casual + white coat. Have a spare “clean” scrubs to change into when you have surgery


(What do doctors/residents/techs constantly harp on?)

-Clinicians expect you to be the “doctors” for your patients. Be ready to do your physical exam, then present the case to the clinician with your plan. They expect you to come up with a treatment plan, look up dosages, know your vaccines and preventatives really well. They truly encourage independence here. Also, techs really emphasizes putting your files in their proper places, and to make sure you submit your Travel Sheet ASAP.

(What are some struggles to watch out for?)

-Don’t forget to submit that Travel Sheet as soon as the client signs the bill (it is easy to forget). Some visits have a lot of paperwork to fill out and things to do, so make a list to keep you on track.

(Words of encouragement)

-you get to do a TON of stuff hands on!

-Puppy and kitten visits! 🙂 Also, this is a very hands-on rotation, and you are doing most everything by yourself. It is also awesome that they let you do surgeries!

(Difficulty Level (1-3)? 1= It’s a breeze/ 3= really difficult workload)

-2 (no inpatients! Yay!)

Through Him!

~Camille

Jeremiah 1:5= “Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, before you were born I set you apart; I appointed you as a prophet to the nations.”

Practice Management Rotation

Practice Management was one of the most invaluable rotations I have taken thus far.  On multiple occasions, I would tell myself that I would immediately apply some of the tools I learned once I owned a practice.  My #1 recommendation when owning a practice is “maintaining a buzz” with the use of fantastic and reliable marketing systems.  The best online software that I was introduced to during practice management is called “Demand Force”.  Check them out! (http://www.demandforce.com/).

A typical week consisted of going to a private practice for 2-3 days then heading back to Athens to finish an evaluation report that exceeds way over 100 pages.  The task set before us while at the clinic was a thorough observation of the entire practice.  Specific zone areas were assessed and analyzed (Exterior Grounds, Reception/Lobby, Exam Rooms, Pharmacy/Labs, Treatment/Surgery/Isolation, Boarding, Grooming, etc.).  We also observed clients in the exam rooms and how the receptionists, technicians, and veterinarians interacted with them.  After observations, we list strengths and various “opportunities”, which is a nicer way of saying “constructive criticism” to help make the practice operate even better.  We also looked at how they publicize and promote their practice.  Seeing if they are a paper or paper-light practice (utilizing the computer to also save medical records) is also another task that we observed while also compiling all their financial reports.  It is a thorough but very necessary approach to give a complete evaluation report for the practices who agreed to use our feedback and resources.
I cannot forget to mention the feasts we would enjoy during the rotation.  We got to go to different restaurants and enjoy anything we wanted on the menu (of course, be reasonable with your selection).  It was like basking in Heaven the way my tastebuds were overjoyed 🙂
Through Him,
~Camille

John 14:26   “But the Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, he will teach you all things and bring to your remembrance all that I have said to you.”

A Couple Weeks Until Rotations! (Spring Week 1)

Hey guys, welcome back!

In the last two years, we were forced to start spring semester on January 2nd while the rest of the UGA campus was deserted.  Now, we began our semester on Jan 5th with the undergraduates.  I appreciated this change very much because I got to spend a little more time with family.

I have never experienced a semester like what I am about to explain to you.  Our core semester will only be 3 WEEKS long!  I thought I went through all the thorny obstacles that vet school offers, but the academic coordinators trusts that we will succeed in these four courses in this short amount of time (Cardiology, Neurology, Practice Management, and Respiratory Diseases).

After these 3 weeks, we will have 5 weeks of electives and then the well-awaited rotations!  Rotations is where we will finally be able to go to the new vet school building and work one-on-one with doctors and assess clinical disorders on patients.  I really cannot wait!

vet school building

vet school construction

They have been working really hard.  This shot was taken in August 2014.  The site is looking more polished now.

I have to share a highlight this week that greatly touched me. I loved what one of the speakers in Practice Management said on Monday, “With $90,000 of student loans after graduating from vet school in the late 80s, I was able to pay off my loans within 4 years.”  YES!  I loved hearing that!  If you guys have not heard this before, I made it my mission and goal to pay off my loans within 5 years, and now I know it is possible to accomplish.  He is an inspiration to me.

Each day this week has been draining me because we would start at 8am and stay in the same room until around 4pm.  Having surgeries last year was a blessing for us because we could leave school most days around noon when it was not our assigned surgery day.  We will only have 2 more weeks of this, so I am not complaining at all.

I have 2 midterms next Monday and Thursday on Neurology and Respiratory Diseases, so I have to go prepare myself for the days to come!

Through Him,

~Camille

Psalm 34:8= “Taste and see that the LORD is good; blessed is the man who takes refuge in him.”