Finals Commence (Week 10)

Week’s itinerary= LA Digestive Final, Theriogenology Final

I finally made it to finals . . . what a journey!  The experience honestly felt as though I had been taking finals since the third week of school the way every week has been so intense.  So, here is how the last 2 weeks of what my core classes will look like:  this week is 2 finals (LA Digestive and Theriogenology (Animal Reproductive Medicine), and next week is 3 finals (Musculoskeletal, SA Digestive, and Radiology).

Last week, all of my exams and quizzes were completed last Thursday, so I had what I deemed a sufficient amount of time to begin studying for my finals this week since my first final began on Wednesday.  As a whole, I thoroughly enjoyed learning about the GI tract in horses, cows, sheep, and goats.  It was not as difficult as I thought it would be.  For this exam (not cumulative), there was a take-home portion (case-based short answers) regarding fluid therapy for sick patients and an in-class portion (multiple choice) regarding diseases of the liver and diarrhea issues.  Some of the material for the in-class exam portion did remind me of studying for bacteriology, virology, and parasitology all over again because of the lists of diseases from these critters we have to be concerned about.  I managed to do well in that class.

The last final for this week, theriogenology (not cumulative), was taken on Friday.  This time we had to learn about stallion, dog, and cat reproduction.  The material I was studying for was so organized and engaging.  However, they made the final only 25 questions like the 3rd exam we took.  I do not like this at all because there is not enough questions to buffer my grade.  The questions were also very challenging and picky again.  I hope I did well (Update:  Did fine!)

This past weekend, I took part in “AthHalf”, which is a half marathon (13.1 miles) celebrating music and art here in Athens.  I was inspired to run this marathon because a classmate of mine who lost 50 pounds decided to run this marathon.  After the 10th mile, I was ready to collapse and go to sleep.  My knees and ankles felt like they were going to dislocate, but it was all worth it! 🙂

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Here is me with church members my Bible study group are a part of.  I was able to finish in around 2:15:00.

One more week to go!

Through Him,

~Camille

2 Timothy 4:7= “I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith.”

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The Absurdity of a Week (Week 4)

Week’s Itinerary= Canine Neuter, Small Animal (SA) Digestive Quiz 1, Theriogenology Exam 1, Large Animal (LA) Digestive Exam 2, Surgery Quiz #3, and Radiology Quiz #4

This week has been crazy, and not just for me.  No matter what room I entered, I could feel the tension and stress from my classmates.  I am so drained, but I have to keep pushing forward.

On Monday, we had our small animal digestive quiz, which covered supplemental reading about gastric dilatation volvulus (which vets call GDV).  Because I have limited experience with working at a small animal practice, this stomach issue for dogs is new to me.  It affects primarily large, deep-chested breeds where there is more room for their stomach to twist and turn on itself causing bloating and other problems.  I was relieved when we were able to answer the questions twice, individually and then in groups.  This made it one of the week’s few stress-free experiences.

Later on that same day, my surgery team did a canine neuter.  If you’ve been reading my posts for a while, you know that I love performing surgery but cringe at being an anesthetist. But this was my assignment on Monday.

The beginning got my heart pumping because as we were going to the operation room, our patient began to wake up.  A common pre-anesthetic drug, propofol, had already been given to make him unconscious.   After giving more propofol and a maintenance gaseous drug, we successfully got him in for surgery.  The only other complication was hypotension (low blood pressure), so I gave the patient more fluids to bring his blood pressure back to a normal systolic reading of > 90mmHg.  Thank you so much lab partners and doctors for helping me settle down and do my part during surgery.

I applaud to those who do anesthesiology as a career — in animal or human medicine — because it is a high-stakes game.

I really needed a long nap after surgery, but I had to prepare for our next task, our first theriogenology exam of the semester.  Before I started vet school, I didn’t even know what “theriogenology” meant. This is what we call reproductive medicine for animals.  The first test covered the reproductive systems of male and female cows, and I got a B+ even though some questions were specific and tricky

One more test and 2 more quizzes to go!  On Friday, we took our second large animal digestive exam, which covered cow and swine digestive concerns.  I was feeling really great in one section of the test, and then I got to questions written by a different professor.  It was brutal.  We have not received our grades back, but I’m hoping it went well. (Update: Got it back.  I can do better…)

Studying for so many quizzes and exams in the same week was a challenge for me and I did not do as well as I had hoped.  A difficult radiology quiz was a wake-up call for me, and afterwards I bolted for the science library to get a radiology book. I’m going to study hard before our second exam comes up next Monday.  Since I was struggling, I had to seek extra assistance by getting this textbook.

I have two exams next week!  Before I tackle that, my body needs to rest.  When I’m not studying this weekend, you can bet that I’ll be sleeping.

Through Him,

~Camille

Psalm 119:114-115 “You are my refuge and my shield; I have put my hope in your word.  Away from me, you evildoers, that I may keep the commands of my God!”

Another Unexpected Loss (Week 2)

Week’s Itinerary: LA Digestive Exam 1, Radiology Quiz # 2 & 3, Surgery and Quiz #2 regarding Feline Neutering

As you may remember, back in January we lost a vet student by the name of Zachary Cowart from Class of 2017.  On Wednesday of this week, we sadly lost another student from Class of 2018.  Here is a message from the Dean:

It is with a very heavy heart that I inform you that we have lost a treasured member of our CVM community.  Sina Shayegan, class of 2018, passed away Wednesday August 27 of unknown cause.  Sina is from Cumming Georgia.  His family is understandably in shock from this tragic loss.  I ask that you keep Sina and his family in your thoughts and prayers during this very difficult time. 

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Here is the Dean and Sina Shayegan during Class of 2018 White Coat Ceremony in August

He will be greatly missed by all his classmates here at the vet school.  I pray that his family will receive comfort during their time of grief.

On the academic front, professors bombarded 3rd years with quizzes and exams this week.  The first quiz was on radiology, which focused on bone diseases that affect young, large-breed dogs.  For example,  Panosteitis is a common cause of lameness, mostly in young  German shepherds. Fortunately, it usually goes away when they mature. We also were tested on Osteochondrosis (OC) and Osteochondritis dessicans (OCD), conditions that cause pain in the shoulders, elbows, tarsus (heel area), and stifle (knee area) of large and giant breeds. We had to identify X-rays for other diseases as well.

The second quiz focused on diseases of the axial skeleton, which consists of the skull and spine of an animal.  So far, the format for all the radiology quizzes has been the same: we’re shown 10 X-rays we have already seen and discussed during lab and asked multiple-choice questions about them. I managed to do very well in both quizzes this week, so I am very thankful.

Neutering my cat for surgery class was a fun experience.  Here are the surgical procedures:

A closed castration was performed on the right testicle.  The right testicle was incised ventrodorsally and the spermatic cord was tied off with a single throw.  The scrotum was left open.

 An open castration was performed on the left testicle.  Using the blade, the testicle was incised ventrodorsally.  The testicle was pushed through the opening.  Then another ventrodorsal incision was made through the parietal tunic covering the testicle and the testicle was pushed through the incision.  After the testicle was free from the scrotum and the tunic, a hemostat was used to pull the ligament of the tail of the epididymis from the epididymis.  A hemostat was used to pull the epididymis away from the testicle and remaining spermatic cord.  Two square knots were created by tying the epididymis to the remaining spermatic cord.  After ligation was complete, the spermatic cord was incised at its distal end and the stub was placed back within the scrotum.  Excess tunic was also transected and removed.  The surgical opening in the skin was left open.

The LA (large animal) Digestive Exam 1 was challenging, but I was ready to conquer it.  The test consisted of 20 multiple-choice questions, 10 written by each of our two professors. One professor’s section much harder than the other’s, but I still managed to get an A.  I was so excited that I called my parents to let them know how well I am doing so far.

Now, I promised I would share with you how Dragon Con went this weekend.  I had a BLAST.  It was a huge costume party of nerds — plus people-watchers like me who’d come to observe tens of thousands of people dressed up like characters from science fiction and fantasy. It was hard to move around sometimes because the five hotels hosting the conference were so crowded.  My friend (who goes every year) said this was the largest, most crowded Dragon Con ever held.  It was a very enjoyable experience regardless. It was funny to be waiting in line for food between a centurion from the movie “300” and some strange alien from Star Wars.

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It felt so surreal walking past costumes like this

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I got the wonderful opportunity of taking a picture with a character from my favorite childhood movie, (Rufio in ”Hook”).  RIP Robin Williams.

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Through Him,

~Camille

 1 Samuel 16:7

“But the LORD said to Samuel, ‘Do not look at his appearance or at the height of his stature, because I have rejected him; for God sees not as man sees, for man looks at the outward appearance, but the LORD looks at the heart.'”